7 Ways to Show Product Value Using Infographics

By Jennifer Gaskin, Apr 13, 2021

Product Infographic Blog Header

Convincing consumers that your product is worth their time and money is one of the most fundamental tasks companies and marketers face. There are virtually limitless options for doing this, but one of the best ways is through the use of a product infographic.

Product infographics are a type of business infographics that combine the benefits of visual communication with the mission-critical task of delivering your company’s value proposition. A product infographic can be used for any business communication needs, be it for internal or external audiences.

With Venngage’s Infographic Maker, you can ensure product value infographics are well-designed and reflect your brand identity, even if you’re not a designer.


 

Let’s explore product infographics that communicate value and go over tips for how you can use infographics to show the value of your product or keep your team organized during the product development life cycle.

Want to learn more about other types of infographics? Read our blog on the 9 main types of infographics or watch the video below:

Click to jump ahead:

 

Why should you use product infographics?

Research has proven the benefits of visuals on humans’ memory and how using visuals such as infographics can improve business communication, which means using infographics to show product value should be a no-brainer for most companies.

In many cases, the value proposition of your company or product isn’t something you share word-for-word with your customers, but it should serve as a guide for everything you do, according to The Balance. That means understanding your customer, what problem your good, service or company solves and what sets you apart.

Given those needs, infographics make a great tool to communicate your company product value and brand identity.

Product infographics also have enormous value internally, as they can help ensure consistency in product messaging or product language used among employees, and that all team members are working toward the same goal.

 

Product infographic examples

Product infographics can be quite literal, describing or displaying a good or service and explaining various aspects or benefits of it. They also can be informative, exploring the details of a problem solved by a given company’s goods or service.

Product Infographic Template Informational Flyer Kettle Fire


 

This example is on the literal side, showing a picture of a physical product, bone broth in this case, and highlighting key aspects. An example like this would be ideal for any sort of physical product, whether it’s food or any other consumer product.

Product Infographic Template Cyber Security Technology Presentation


 

Instead of focusing on the product itself, a product infographic can put the problem at hand front-and-center, as this infographic pitch deck example does. A variety of data and informational content tell the story rather than the good or service being the focus.

 

7 ways to show product value with infographics

Let’s take a look at some specific ways you can show product value using infographics, including many templates you can get started with today.

  1. Focus on the biggest benefits
  2. Contrast product with other options
  3. Show how it works
  4. Illustrate history of company or product
  5. Spotlight the problem
  6. Share pro tips
  7. Dig into numbers

1. Focus on the biggest benefits

One of the simplest ways of illustrating product value through an infographic is by listing out its biggest benefits. This holds true for many types of products, including physical items as well as service-based products.

Let’s take a look at the home cooking infographic below:

Product Infographic Template Home Cooking Editorial Flyer


 

While this example doesn’t exactly deal with one physical item, the approach is perfect for products or services where it’s possible to create a visual representation of what’s being sold. Surrounding the main image are the biggest selling points.

Product Infographic Template Org Chart Benefits List


 

Benefit-based product infographic layouts don’t have to rely on images of the product or a graphic representation of it, as this example illustrates. Making the infographic on the longer side also gives you more room to expand upon the benefits and features.

2. Contrast product with other options

Depending on your industry, your product could be up against dozens of others in the minds of consumers, or perhaps you need a way to help buyers understand the options in a slate of product offerings.

Comparison infographics are ideal for communicating about products and services, and they are at their best when they help buyers make a decision.

This infographic, for example, is an ideal tool for helping a regular person understand whether solar energy is right for them. No specific product is mentioned, but the basic benefits and drawbacks of solar energy are the focus.

Product Infographic Solar Energy Comparison Infographic Template


 

In other cases, it’s helpful to be overtly commercial, comparing your product or service to competitors. As this product infographic does, the hero product is highlighted, while the reader can see where it compares and contrasts with other tutoring options.

Product Infographic Marketing Competitor Pricing Comparison Infographic


 

Depending on your company and product offerings, it’s often helpful to give customers a way to select the right option for them from a slate of possibilities. In this pricing comparison infographic, one option is highlighted, and it’s easy to imagine versions being created for a variety of user personas.

Product Infographic CRM Sales Pricing Comparison Template


 

3. Show how it works

Helping customers use your product is an excellent way to make sure they’re getting the most out of it, which ensures they will be able to see its value.

Videos are a popular way to do this, like this one about how to make an infographic in 5 steps:

But infographics also take advantage of the power of visual learning. That could mean designing an infographic that describes in detail how to use your product, while for some products and industries, infographics that are more general can be effective.

This product launch example can be used as is for internal communication, or it can easily be customized to serve as a quick-start guide for a user or customer, ensuring they have the basic knowledge required to make the most of their new purchase.

Product Infographic 7 Step Product Launch


 

Discussing a topic generally is also an excellent way to help users or buyers understand how the product works. Even though in this example the product itself is not the focus, the simple visualization of how solar power works and what components are involved can help a new buyer understand how to use the product.

Product Infographic Solar Power Infographic Transparent New Wattages

Source

4. Illustrate history of company or product

Engage potential customers by describing how the product was developed or why your company was formed in the first place. Most modern consumers are swayed by compelling brand narratives. According to a Stackla survey, 86% of consumers say brand authenticity is important in the decisions they make.

That means not only ensuring that your products are useful and effective but that you make an emotional connection to the story of your company and what it offers consumers.

Related15+ Company Infographic Templates, Examples & Tips

A company history like this example could work for both long-lived companies and startups, as it’s easy to customize with Venngage’s Infographic Maker.

Product Infographic Technology Company History Timeline Template


 

In some cases, your story will focus on the history of your company, but examining the space in which your product or company exists is also a good option. For example, the infographic below would be ideal for a company launching an instant messaging app, as it crafts a detailed journey in consumers’ minds.

Product Infographic Instant Messaging Simple Timeline Template


 

5. Spotlight the problem

Connecting with consumers about the issues your product or company addresses is a great way not only to build a relationship but to take advantage of the data visualization aspect of many types of infographics.

Product Infographic Annual Corporate Wellness Facts Template


 

This infographic doesn’t reference a specific product but rather shares information about the broader issue, including how companies and workers perceive corporate wellness programs.

The infographic above could be easily adapted for any industry, and by using Venngage’s My Brand Kit feature, you ensure your logo, fonts and colors are being used properly.

Product Infographic Fireworks Safety Fire and Injury Infographic Template


 

Similarly, this infographic aims to raise awareness of the risks of fireworks injuries, which often spike around July 4th. The brand in this case is a nonprofit, but this advocacy approach is applicable to any industry.

Related6 Types of Nonprofit Infographics to Boost Your Campaigns

6. Share pro tips

What better way to make sure your customers become expert-level users of your product or service than by sharing pro tips with them? Pro tip infographics for products should go beyond what would show up in a basic user manual.

Product Infographic Tips Create Product List Template


 

While the above example deals with the product development process itself, it’s an excellent format for sharing advice that helps users think differently about your product, and it can help you reinforce best practices.

Product Infographic Work Remote Tips Instagram Carousel Template


 

As this Instagram carousel template illustrates, it’s not always necessary to offer tips about the actual product itself. As in other product infographics that don’t directly reference your specific product or service, a pro tip infographic can also make your brand stand out as a thought leader or trusted source of advice.

7. Dig into numbers

A close cousin to product infographics that delve into the original problem being solved by the product are ones that take deep dives into data surrounding trends, crises or broader societal issues. As with other examples, these need not always be directly tied to the product or company.

Product Infographic Remote Working Employee vs CEO


 

This statistical infographic, for example, breaks down survey data related to remote work, but no specific product or service is mentioned. Note that many types of data and visualizations are included, as are important takeaways.

Product Infographic Blood Donation In Numbers Template


 

A numbers-based product infographic can also be tightly focused and brief, as in this blood donation infographic. This layout is ideal when you don’t have survey data that allows for expansive data storytelling.

 

Product development infographic

So far, we’ve detailed ways to use infographics externally to engage customers and readers. But product infographics are also ideal for internal use, particularly when it comes to product development. Keep teams on task and make sure nothing falls through the cracks with a product development infographic.

Product development infographics are a perfect match for a timeline format, like this one that not only uses the familiar layout but also takes advantage of data visualization via pie charts in the center.

Product Infographic 8 Week Sprint Basic Timeline Template


 

Timeline-based product infographics can also help projects stay on track even when they involve multiple departments. This product roadmap infographic that uses a Gantt chart style is an excellent method for cross-departmental teams.

Product Infographic Simple Product Roadmap Template


 

Not sure how to make a product roadmap? Follow these simple steps to create a Gantt chart that can help you keep projects on task and on time.

Product Infographic How To Create Product Roadmap Template


 

Timeline-based product development infographics can also take a more creative approach by counting down instead of counting up. In other words, want to launch a new product on a certain date? Use this infographic to schedule all the milestones along the way.

Product Infographic Creative Product Launch Roadmap Template


 

Lengthy projects and product development processes can run out of steam, which frustrates teams and threatens the bottom line. This product roadmap can help all involved understand when various tasks need to be done based on a quarterly calendar.

Product Infographic Quarterly Concept Product Roadmap Template


 

In some cases, it’s necessary to think much farther into the future than just the next year, as this example illustrates. Product development infographics can help people across the organization understand major milestones toward a huge company goal.

Product Infographic Creative Product Roadmap 2023 Template


 

Product development infographics are also useful for describing the product development process itself. Whether it’s for internal use, such as onboarding a new employee, or something you share with a potential customer, infographics are a helpful tool in visualizing product development, or any other process you might be engaged in.

Product Infographic Product Development Process Template


 

This product development process infographic is horizontal, which is ideal for compact storytelling, and it’s easily printable thanks to its size.

Product Infographic Company Product Development Process Template


 

Product development process infographics are also friendly in a long, vertical format, and it’s typically easier to create these since you don’t have to be as sparing with words.

 

Product features infographic

We touched on this already, but an ideal use for infographics in pitching or promoting your product is explaining features. Product features infographics have become ubiquitous in many online sellers like Amazon.

The infographic below explains the features of an HP printer. The use of icons and other visuals makes it easier for people to scan all the information at a glance.

Product Infographic Amazon HP Printer Product Feature Example

Source

Infographics can be used to describe the features of a single product, like the one below:

Product Infographic Vintage Risotto Product Feature Flyer


 

Or they can be used to compare features of one good or service with its competitors, like this product infographic that compares different brands of website builders:

Product Infographic Website Host Product Feature Comparison Template


 

When creating a product features infographic, it’s important to keep the platform in mind; how will people read this? If it’s accompanying an online store listing, such as Amazon or another service, be sure to follow sizing recommendations.

 

Product life cycle infographic

Product Infographic 5 Step Product Design Process Cycle Template


 

Most companies are working on new products all the time, which is why a product development infographic that’s arranged in a circular format like the one above is ideal. Few products last forever, and companies need to develop product life cycles that can be repeated again and again.

Product life cycle infographics can help entrepreneurs, innovators and makers of all kinds visualize what it takes to get a product or service from their minds to market.

 

Value chain infographics

A product infographic could be described as a value chain infographic if it details the processes required to create a product that generates sales. A value chain encompasses all the activities by which the company makes its money.

So for companies that sell products, value chain infographics could come in the form of product roadmaps, assuming they describe or visualize the departments, inputs and outputs, resources and all other processes involved in product development.

Product Infographic Simple Product Management Roadmap Template


 

Value chain infographics can also help identify areas of overlap or conflict that could negatively affect product development.

 

Product infographic design

How can you make the most of infographics to promote your products or services? Here are some tips for product infographic design:

  • If you’re promoting a physical product, make sure you have high-resolution images of it from all angles. That gives you the maximum amount of design flexibility, which will let you be as creative as possible.
  • Don’t go all-in on a single type of infographic. We’ve explored lots of product infographics, some of which won’t be right for your purposes, but it’s best to mix up infographic types as part of your overall content strategy.
  • Keep it simple. Especially if you’re taking our advice in the previous bullet point, make every product infographic tightly focused on just one purpose, and keep text to a minimum.
  • Use Venngage to make sure your brand identity, including logos and colors, is integrated into every product infographic you create.
  • Consider making multiple versions of each product infographic, creating designs of a variety of sizes depending on the platforms you’re using. If it’s for an online product listing, including Amazon, be sure you understand size restrictions.
  • Know your audience. Some people who see your infographic will be ready to buy the product, but most people won’t, and it’s wise to be subtle with logos and other overtly commercial aspects in infographics where the subject isn’t the product itself.

 

In summary: Product infographics can engage internal and external audiences, boost your credibility and turn potential buyers into power users

Product infographics can keep your teams and projects on time and on budget, they can help you be a thought leader in your space, and they can harness the power of visual communication to engage your audience.

Whether you’re using a product infographic to help a new user get the most out of a physical product or you’re driving audience engagement by sharing user survey data, product infographics are a natural fit in any marketing strategy.

Start creating your own product infographic for free with Venngage’s drag-and-drop editor and hundreds of easy-to-edit templates.


 

 

 

About Jennifer Gaskin

A veteran of newsrooms and agencies, Jennifer Gaskin is a writer, editor and designer who is the only living person not to have strong feelings on the Oxford comma. She's an award-winning practitioner of journalism and information design who spent the better part of a decade as the creative director of a digital marketing shop. As a writer, Jennifer contributes to a variety of publications while working with clients as well as taking on her own projects.