20+ Best Google Font Pairs for 2021 [FREE DOWNLOAD]

By Jennifer Gaskin, Jun 17, 2021

Best Google Fonts

More than 1,000 fonts are available in the Google Font catalog, making it the biggest and easiest-to-use free font repository out there.

The sheer volume of available fonts can make creating font combinations feel overwhelming, but we can help you pick the best Google Fonts.

Choose from one of our tried-and-true Google Font combinations for your next design project. These fonts can be used in infographics, pitch decks and everything else in between.


 

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  1. Alegreya + Source Sans Pro
  2. Alfa Slab + Open Sans
  3. Anton + Roboto
  4. Abril Fatface + Poppins
  5. Great Vibes + Montserrat
  6. Lato + Karla
  7. Libre Baskerville + Source Sans Pro
  8. Lobster + Open Sans
  9. Lora + Nunito
  10. Lora + Lato
  11. Merriweather + Lato
  12. Oswald + EB Garamond
  13. Oxygen + Open Sans
  14. Philosopher + Mulish
  15. Playfair Display + Source Sans Pro
  16. Raleway + Source Sans Pro
  17. Raleway + Lato
  18. Roboto + Cabin
  19. Roboto Slab + Roboto
  20. Ubuntu + Open Sans
  21. Work Sans + Open Sans
  22. Yellowtail + Lato

 

1. Alegreya + Source Sans Pro

Best Google Fonts

Alegreya’s origins as a literary-inspired font contrast well against Source Sans Pro’s condensed, minimalist appearance. Alegreya was named one of the 53 fonts of the decade at a 2011 typography competition, while Source Sans Pro was released by Adobe designer Paul D. Hunt in 2012.

Both fonts are ideal for lengthy text, particularly Source Sans Pro as it was designed to function in user interfaces. By pairing a serif font (Alegreya) with a sans-serif font (Source Sans Pro), you will naturally draw the reader’s eye to the contrast.

Try it: Use Alegreya as your header font and Source Sans Pro as the body text in a long report or presentation.

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2. Alfa Slab + Open Sans

Best Google Fonts

Bring drama or vintage style to your designs by using Alfa Slab, a super-thick font that calls to mind the design of a bygone era. Use it alongside Open Sans, a modern, humanist typeface that’s one of the most versatile in Google’s entire catalog.

The contrast of a slab with a sans serif font creates natural visual interest, while the heavy weight of Alfa Slab isn’t too much for Open Sans to keep up with.

Try it: Use this pairing for infographics, reports or presentations, but watch out for sizing. Alfa Slab can become difficult to read under about 30 pixels.

For more advice on how to choose the best fonts for your infographics, read our blog: Choosing the Right Infographics Fonts for Business Communications

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3. Anton + Roboto

Best Google Fonts

The inspiration for Anton was traditional sans serif advertising fonts used over the past several decades, while Roboto’s natural forms give the air of a humanist font and make it easy on the eyes.

Making Roboto the secondary font to Anton puts the spotlight squarely on Anton’s unique construction in which the ascending and descending elements are just barely taller than the rest.

Try it: Use Anton for the title and headings in your infographics and Roboto for the body text, or let Anton steal the show in your reports, presentations or flyers.

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4. Abril Fatface + Poppins

Best Google Fonts

Let your content take a journey to the past by using Abril Fatface. The font’s tilting weights are a throwback to advertising posters common in 19th century Europe, and putting them alongside the heavily geometric sans serif typeface Poppins brings much-needed contrast.

Poppins includes 18 total styles, and we recommend using the thin or extra-light versions with Abril Fatface. That gives you multiple layers of contrast, including serif/sans serif and varying weights.

Try it: Use Abril Fatface for headings of at least 40 pixels, and use Poppins’ varying weights for other uses in your business communications, flyers or resumes.

Did you know resumes call for specific types of fonts? Check out our blog on the best resume fonts for 2021 to learn more.Best Google Fonts


 

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5. Great Vibes + Montserrat

Best Google Fonts

Invite whimsy to the party by pairing a display font like Great Vibes with a Buenos Aires-inspired sans serif like Montserrat. The perfectly named Great Vibes calls to mind a day at the beach, while Montserrat’s origin is in traditional Argentinian design.

Great Vibes can’t go any lower than about 60 pixels to remain legible, so it’s not ideal for every use, while Montserrat is a diverse font that offers weights from thin to black. It goes best with Great Vibes in the thin-to-light range.

Try it: Use Great Vibes with Montserrat in your lighthearted infographics or on physical products like menus or flyers.

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6. Lato + Karla

Best Google Fonts

So far, we’ve recommended a lot of contrast in your font pairings, but using fonts in the same theme—in this case, two sans serifs—has the same sophistication as a tone-on-tone interior design scheme.

Lato’s roots are Polish, and designer Łukasz Dziedzic wanted to give Lato a timeless feel. Designed by Jonny Pinhorn, Karla has a quirky nature that makes it an excellent secondary font.

Try it: Lato and Karla are an ideal pairing for infographics, data visualization or reports and presentations. Size should not be a concern, as both reproduce well even in small print.

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7. Libre Baskerville + Source Sans Pro

Best Google Fonts

Libre Baskerville is familiar to typography heads, taking its name from the 1940s Baskerville font. Libre Baskerville makes some adjustments that let it work better on screens than its namesake.

Pairing Libre Baskerville with a utility player like Source Sans Pro means that your body text and other small elements will remain ultra-legible and your headings and display elements will stand apart.

Try it: Combine Libre Baskerville with Source Sans Pro for reports, presentations and infographics.

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8. Lobster + Open Sans

Best Google Fonts

There’s a reason Lobster, a script display font, has had tens of millions of downloads since it was added to Google’s library—it has the flowing appeal of cursive handwriting without being hard to read. That makes it useful for designers who want to add the authenticity of hand-lettering without the time or expense.

Lobster and Open Sans, the versatile sans serif, are a natural pair. Open Sans’ readability matches well with the visual allure of Lobster, though designers will need to watch out for sizing. Even though it’s more legible than most script fonts, Lobster still can become muddy when used too small.

Try it: Use Lobster and Open Sans for flyers, posters and menus.

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9. Lora + Nunito

Best Google Fonts

Lora, an elegant serif, and Nunito, a whimsical sans serif, work well together because they’re curvy but in different places. Nunito’s curves are obvious, with letters terminating in rounded edges, while Lora’s shapeliness extends to both the body if its letters and its serif strokes.

Both fonts have a variety of weights, so sophisticated designers should play around with matching or contrasting them for a variety of purposes, though it’s important to keep good design principles in mind always. After all, you want some text to stand out.

Try it: Pair Lora and Nunito in your presentations, brochures and flyers.

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10. Lora + Lato

Best Google Fonts

Lora is also a natural complement to Lato and its timelessly cool vibe. Again, both fonts offer a variety of weights, so try Lora bold and Lato light to bring an immediate contrast to your designs.

While Lora tends to hold up well regardless of size, if you experiment with weights, you’ll need to be mindful of sizing. Bold and italicized versions are challenging to read at anything below about 24 pixels.

Try it: Use Lora and Lato in your infographics, presentations, reports and more.

Lora and Lato are part of our recommended best free fonts for 2021. Check out the rest here: 40+ Best Free Fonts for 2021

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11. Merriweather + Lato

Best Google Fonts

Merriweather offers an imposing but friendly appearance, which makes it perfect for main titles, headlines and other large text. Pairing it with Lato brings it back down to earth, and varying weights can help create a hierarchy of text.

As they cover both the serif and sans serif space, Merriweather and Lato are a natural pair, and since they both come in a variety of weights, designers will have the utmost in flexibility to find uses that work for them.

Try it: Make Merriweather black your choice for section headings in an annual report to bring a sense of authority to the proceedings. Employ versatile Lato for just about everything else to allow the major text to shine.

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12. Oswald + EB Garamond

Best Google Fonts

Designers who want to pair Oswald with a bold serif that’s from this century should consider EB Garamond. This font is the result of a crowdsourced effort to revive Claude Garamont’s iconic humanist typefaces from the mid-1500s. (Guess it’s not really from this century after all.)

EB Garamond is a pretty versatile font as it offers 10 weights. This is ideal for designers who want to create typographic hierarchy without using more than two fonts.

Try it: Use Oswald with EB Garamond in your infographics, annual reports, flyers or banners.

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13. Oxygen + Open Sans

Best Google Fonts

Oxygen and Open Sans are both sans serif fonts, and while Oxygen was designed for computer user interfaces, it’s a friendly, approachable font that conveys authority without being overpowering.

Visual contrast will need to come into play, and while Oxygen isn’t as versatile as Open Sans, it does come in three free varieties ranging from light to bold.

Try it: Set the headings and display elements in Oxygen bold and your text in Open Sans regular in your annual reports or pitch decks.

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14. Philosopher + Mulish

Best Google Fonts

Philosopher’s designer, Jovanny Lemonad, released the initial version with intentional mistakes, and even though it’s been revised considerably since 2008, Philosopher still has an energetic, almost chaotic feel owing to its turbulent start. Named Muli until 2020, Mulish was crafted by typography legend Vernon Adams, who designed the sans serif font for display and text.

When they’re paired together, Philosopher and Mulish join forces to provide the foundation of a design that’s spirited but well-grounded.

Try it: Pair Philosopher and Mulish in infographics, banners, flyers or for business communications in fields where your audience can handle a bit of excitement.

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15. Playfair Display + Source Sans Pro

Best Google Fonts

Playfair Display is an elegant serif font that takes its inspiration from quill-and-ink writing tools of the late 18th century, while Source Sans Pro is a reliable sans serif that will allow Playfair Display to take center stage.

Versatility is rampant in both fonts, as they each offer 12 weights, ranging from extra light to regular to black. This allows creative designers to experiment with weights to create a clear design hierarchy.

Try it: Playfair Display and Source Sans Pro are an ideal combination for just about any use, from infographics and data visualization to annual reports and pitch decks.

Thinking of picking this pair as your brand fonts but not sure if they fit your brand personality? Check out our blog to learn everything you need to know about picking brand fonts.Best Google Fonts


 

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16. Raleway + Source Sans Pro

Best Google Fonts

Raleway started its life at a single, thin weight after being introduced by designer Matt McInerney before being expanded by Pablo Impallari and Rodrigo Fuenzalida in 2012. Today, the elegant sans serif font offers more than a dozen variations, which makes it an ideal sans-on-sans teammate with Source Sans Pro.

In addition to being a nice-looking font, Raleway is unusual in that its letter W, both upper and lower case, has distinctive, crisscrossing upward strokes. If the letter W features prominently in your business name, consider using Raleway to create your company logo.

Try it: Aside from logos, combine Raleway with Source Sans Pro for infographics, business reports, pitch decks, resumes and more.

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17. Raleway + Lato

Best Google Fonts

Both Raleway and Lato are fonts we’ve discussed a bit, but these two approachable sans serif fonts are a natural pairing. Designers should remember that pairing similar fonts together can be tricky, which is why we recommend making Raleway the star and Lato the supporting player.

Raleway has more than a dozen weights, and the difference between thin and black could be mistaken for a separate font if not for the distinctive Ws.

Try it: Pair Raleway with Lato in your infographics, resume, banners and presentations.

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18. Roboto + Cabin

Best Google Fonts

Roboto is something of a typographic hybrid. As we mentioned, its airy letterforms have a humanist feel about them, meaning they appear as if created by a human hand. But Roboto is technically a geometric sans serif. Cabin is also sans serif, but a solidly humanist one, which gives the two a clear connection.

Both offer a variety of weights, which lets designers experiment and find the best combinations for their work.

Try it: Combine Roboto bold or black with Cabin regular to create authoritative titles and headers in newsy infographics or corporate communications.

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19. Roboto Slab + Roboto

Best Google Fonts

If you’ve ever seen two cousins who look just enough alike that you can tell they’re related, you understand why Roboto Slab and Roboto work well together.

One big benefit of using these two typefaces together is that because the letterforms all originate from the same source, the pairing creates an organic fit that’s pleasing to the eye. In other words, there’s no risk of jarring the reader out of consuming your content.

Try it: Use Roboto Slab with its cousin Roboto for just about any design, from infographics to data visualization to pitch decks and marketing proposals.

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20. Ubuntu + Open Sans

Best Google Fonts

Given that it was created for the open-source Linux operating system of the same name, it’s not surprising that Ubuntu has a technical, almost futuristic feel. While it was made to enable an operating system’s user interface, Ubuntu has uses far beyond that.

Pairing it with another sans serif, Open Sans, lets designers dip their toes into futuristic waters without feeling like they walked through a portal.

Try it: Use Ubuntu with Open Sans for infographics and data visualization, and if you’re in the tech space, the combination is useful for just about anything.

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21. Work Sans + Open Sans

Best Google Fonts

Work Sans designer Wei Huang took inspiration from sans serif fonts of the early 19th and 20th centuries, giving the font a huge range of variability, including extreme weights that are ideal for display type.

Open Sans is a natural complement to Work Sans, and because both offer tons of variety, it’s easy to find the precise pairings that work for your design. Watch out for readability issues if using some of Work Sans’ heavier weights like extra-bold or black.

Try it: Use this combo in infographics, corporate communications and resumes.

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22. Yellowtail + Lato

Best Google Fonts

Give your designs an improvisational feel by using Yellowtail as your header or display font. This brush script typeface stands apart thanks to its unique letterforms, which are a mix of connecting and non-connecting. The result brings your designs an air of unpredictability, which is at a premium in the crowded marketplace.

Using Yellowtail for display and header type and Lato for body text and other elements is an excellent way to bring stability and comfort to your design.

Try it: Use this pairing for infographics, banners, email marketing and more.

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Best Google Fonts FAQs

Do you have more questions about Google Fonts? We’ve got answers.

How do you use Google Fonts?

Web developers can use Google Fonts by simply generating a bit of code they paste into the site they’re creating, while other designers can download the font family of their choice just by selecting “download family” on the font screen.

What are the best Google Fonts?

The Google Fonts that are best for most organizations are those with a great deal of variety, meaning designers to vary weights to create new works. Some of the fonts that fit this bill include Open Sans, Source Sans Pro, Raleway, Montserrat and Roboto.

How do you add Google Fonts to Venngage?

Once you’ve downloaded the Google Fonts you want to use, you can upload them to Venngage with just a few clicks using My Brand Kit.

best google fonts

My Brand Kit also allows Business users to automatically upload their branding elements and apply their brand style guide to any of their design in one click:

best google fonts

 

In summary: There are more than 1.1 million possible combinations of Google Fonts

Once you’ve found the fonts that will bring your projects to life and show the personality of your organization, add them using My Brand Kit with a couple of clicks so you can ensure all your designs remain on brand.

Download our recommended best free Google fonts and see how they look on a Venngage template. It’s free to get started.


 

 

 

About Jennifer Gaskin

A veteran of newsrooms and agencies, Jennifer Gaskin is a writer, editor and designer who is the only living person not to have strong feelings on the Oxford comma. She's an award-winning practitioner of journalism and information design who spent the better part of a decade as the creative director of a digital marketing shop. As a writer, Jennifer contributes to a variety of publications while working with clients as well as taking on her own projects.